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October 30 1812: Byron's Blow to the Head


On October 30 1812, Lord Byron writes to Lady Melbourne and relates a story of receiving a blow to the head from a stone thrown by a child. He writes:  
The Country round this place is wild & beautiful, consequently very delightful: I think altogether preferable even to Middleton (where the beauties certainly did not belong to the landscape) although the recollection of my visit there will always retain its “proper” preeminence – – I am at present however a little laid up, for a short time ago I received a blow with a stone thrown by accident by one of the children as I was viewing the remains of a Roman encampment. – It struck me – providentially – though near the eye – yet far enough to prevent the slightest injury to that very material organ, & though I was a little stunned & the stone being very sharp the wound bled rather profusely, I have now re==covered all but a slight scar, which will remain I rather think for a considerable time. – It just missed  an Artery, which at first from the blood’s flowing in a little spout, was supposed to be cut, but this was a false alarm, indeed I believe it has done me good, for my headachs have since entirely ceased. – This is my old luck, always near something serious, & generally escaping as now with a slight accident. – An inch either way, – the temple – the eye – or eyelid – would have made this no jesting matter – as it is – I thank my good Genius that I have still two eyes left to admire you with, & a head (uncracked) which will derive great benefit from any thing which may spring from your own. 
Byron's letter is reproduced below.

Byron to Lady Melbourne, from Eywood, Herefordshire, October 30th 1812: 

Eywood. Presteign. –
Octr. 30th. 1812 

My dear Ly. M. – Though you have not written to me lately I can account for the prudential silence & do not blame you although one of your epistles anywhere is a great comfort. – Every thing stands as you could wish, & as I wished & nothing more need be said on that subject. – – – I have had an epistle from Ireland, short & full of resignation, so that I trust your cares are nearly wound up in that quarter; at least I must appeal to you if I have not done everything in my power to bring them to a conclusion, & now I have more reasons than ever for wishing them never to be renewed. – – – – – 

The Country round this place is wild & beautiful, consequently very delightful: I think altogether preferable even to Middleton (where the beauties certainly did not belong to the landscape) although the recollection of my visit there will always retain its “proper” preeminence – – I am at present however a little laid up, for a short time ago I received a blow with a stone thrown by accident by one of the children as I was viewing the remains of a Roman encampment. – It struck me – providentially – though near the eye – yet far enough to prevent the slightest injury to that very material organ, & though I was a little stunned & the stone being very sharp the wound bled rather profusely, I have now re==covered all but a slight scar, which will remain I rather think for a considerable time. – It just missed  an Artery, which at first from the blood’s flowing in a little spout, was supposed to be cut, but this was a false alarm, indeed I believe it has done me good, for my headachs have since entirely ceased. – This is my old luck, always near something serious, & generally escaping as now with a slight accident. – An inch either way, – the temple – the eye – or eyelid – would have made this no jesting matter – as it is – I thank my good Genius that I have still two eyes left to admire you with, & a head (uncracked) which will derive great benefit from any thing which may spring from your own. – – I suppose you have left London, as I see by the papers Ld. & Ly. Cowper are returned to Herts.

 – If you hear anything that you think I ought to know, depend upon my seconding you to the utmost, but I believe you will coincide with me in opinion that there is little apprehension now of any scene from C= –  & still less occasion even to have recourse to A– as your “forlorn hope” on that account. – – I leave it to you to deal with Ly. B – &c. – say of me what you please but do not let any other name be taken in vain – particularly to one whom you so well know as that ingenious hyperbolist Ly B. I am sick of scenes & have imbibed a taste for something like quiet. – Do not quite forget me – for everywhere I remember you. ever dr. Ly. M. yr. most affectionate 
       
BN 
  
P.S. 
 Why are you silent? – do you doubt me in the “bowers of Armida”? – I certainly am very much enchanted, but your spells will always retain their full force – try them. – 

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