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June 8 1812: Foster to Monroe

On June 8, 1812, Augustus Foster, the British Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States, finds more correspondence that show the British government has made attempts "in restraining the Indians from committing any act of hostility against the citizens of the United States." He sends the documents to Secretary of State James Monroe. 
Mr. Foster to the Secretary of State. Washington, June 8, 1812.
Sir, Since I had the honor of writing to you yesterday, I have received some additional papers relating to the subject mentioned in my letter, which I transmit to you, enclosed. They consist of a letter from Sir James Craig to Lord Liverpool, enclosing the extract of a letter from Lieutenant Governor Gore, and of the instructions which he had given to the Deputy Superintendent of Indian Affairs, to exert himself in restraining the Indians from committing any act of hostility against the citizens of the United States.Allow me, sir, to request that these papers may, without loss of time, be communicated to the President.I have the honor, &.c.AUGUSTUS J. FOSTER.
[Referred to in Mr. Foster's letter of June 8, 1812.] 
Extract of a letter from Lieutenant Governor Gore to His Excellency Sir James Craig.
Quebec, May 21,1811.
My Lord:  In a despatch, No. 37, I thought it right to apprize your lordship of the appearance of hostile intentions towards the Americans which had shown itself among the Indians in the upper country, as well as of the steps I had taken on the occasion.
In pursuing the same subject, I have now the honor to enclose copies of the letter I have received from Lieutenant Governor Gore, and of the instructions which, in consequence of mine to him, he had given to the Deputy Superintendent of Indian Affairs.I have the honor to be, &c.J. H. CRAIG.

Extract of a letter from Lieutenant Governor Gore to His Excellency Sir James Craig.
York, Upper Canada, March 2, 1811. I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your excellency's letter of the 2d of February, which reached roe on the 24th. I lost no time in directing the Deputy Superintendent General of Indian Affairs to instruct the officers of the Indian Department to caution and restrain the Indians from committing any act of hostility on the white inhabitants in the neighborhood. A copy of my letter to Colonel Claus is herewith transmitted.
Extract of a letter from Lieutenant Governor Gore to Colonel Claus, Deputy Superintendent General of Indian  Affairs.
York Place, February 26, 1811. 
In further notice of Mr. Elliott's letters to you, it is desirable that you should desire him to be more than usually circumspect in his communications with the Indians, so as to leave no possible suspicion of favoring their projected hostilities against the United States of America. You will, therefore, direct him, as occasion may offer, to impress upon the Indians the certainty of eventual misfortune to themselves from any attack on the whites; to point out to them that the Americans are become so strong, that any effort on their part to prevail by arms must be vain; and, that it is from such an assurance, and out of regard to their safety, comfort, and happiness, that their great father expressly forbids that any encouragement should be afforded to them in any warlike enterprise.

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