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July 15 1812: Hull's Zenith


On July 15 1812, Brigadier-General Hull writes the Secretary of War Eustis from Sandwich, Upper Canada. Hull is still very confident. He expects the desertions of the Canadian militia to continue. He writes:"The Canadian militia are deserting from Malden in large parties; about sixty came in yesterday. I send them to their homes and give them protection. The probability is that the greatest part of them will desert in a few days".  For the British, Colonel Elliott writing to Colonel Claus confirms the effect of Hull's Proclamation leading to desertions of the militia. He writes: "Their Proclamations have operated very powerfully on our Militia (who had come forward with as much promptitude as could have been expected). Since their issuing our Militia have left their Posts and returned to their homes, so that since Sunday the number is reduced to about one half, and I expect that in two or three days we shall have very few of them at the post".  

At the same time, Colonel Elliot notes that he has been able to retain the support of the natives at Amherstburgh thanks to the leadership of Tecumseh. Colonel Elliott writes: "The Indians with us are between 3 & 400 who have resisted every allurement which Gen Hull laid before them. Tech-Kum-thai has kept them faithful-- he has shewn himself to be a determined character and a great friend to our Government. 

Hull's letter is reproduced below.


BRIG.-GENERAL HULL TO THE SECRETARY OF WAR. 

Sandwich, July 15, 1812. 
Sir, — The Canadian militia are deserting from Malden in large parties; about sixty came in yesterday. I send them to their homes and give them protection. The probability is that the greatest part of them will desert in a few days. 

The force under my command and the movement into this province has had a great effect on the Indians. They are daily returning to their villages. A very large council is now sitting at Brownstown. The Wyandots are at the head of it. The object is to induce all the nations to be neutral. I furnish them with provisions. The Crane, Walk-in-the-Water, Blackhoof, Blue Jacket,. &c., &c., &c., are zealous friends of neutrality. 

I have great hopes the object will be effected. I have reason to believe the number of hostile Indians is decreasing. The inhabitants have received my proclamation with great satisfaction so far as information has been received. 

I shall march the army to Malden as soon as the necessary preparations can be made for the siege. 

As the British have no naval force above Detroit and as we now command the river, I shall direct the brig Adams to be completed and armed as soon as possible for the purpose of supplying the posts at Michilimackinae and Chicago with provisions and the necessary stores provided we can obtain them 
here. 


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