Pages

July 28 1812: Brock's Awkward Predictament

On July 28, 1812, Major General Isaac Brock, in Upper Canada, again writes to Sir George Prevost, in Lower Canada to update him the on the parliamentary session. Brock writes:

A more decent House has not been elected since the formation of the province — but I perceive at once that I shall get no good of them.
They, like the magistrates and others in office, evidently mean to remain passive. The repeal of the Habeas Corpus - will not pass, and if I have recourse to the Law Martial I am told the whole armed force will disperse. Never was an officer placed in a more awkward predicament — The Militia  cannot possibly be governed by the present Law — all admit the fact, yet the fear of giving offence, will prevent any thing effectual from being effected — I entreat the advice of Your Excellency!
Brock`s letter is reproduced below.

MAJOR-GENERAL BBOCK TO SIR GEORGE PREVOST. 
York July 28 1812- 

Sir, I consider the enclosed letter this instant received from the Hon[rable] James Baby of sufficient importance to forward by express — 

I conceived the Long Point Militia the most likely to shew the best disposition of any in this part of the Country, and their refusal to join Captain Chambers indicates the little reliance that ought to be place (d) in any of them — My situation is getting each day more critical I still mean to try and send a force to the relief of Amherstburg, but almost despair of succeeding — The population, though I had no great confidence in the majority, is worse than I expected to find it. And all Magistrates &c &c appear quite confounded, and decline acting. The consequence is the most improper conduct is tolerated. The officers of Militia exert no authority, every thing shew as if a certainty existed of a change taking place soon. But I still hope the arrival of re-inforcements may yet avert such a dire calamity. Many in that case would become active in our cause who are now dormant 

I have the honor herewith to transmit a Copy of my Speech to the two houses delivered yesterday A more decent House has not been elected since the formation of the province — but I perceive at once that I shall get no good of them. 

They, like the magistrates and others in office, evidently mean to remain passive. The repeal of the Habeas Corpus - will not pass, and if I have recourse to the Law Martial I am told the whole armed force will disperse. Never was an officer placed in a more awkward predicament — The Militia  cannot possibly be governed by the present Law — all admit the fact, yet the fear of giving offence, will prevent any thing effectual from being effected — I entreat the advice of Your Excellency! Some letters rec[eived] from individuals represent the conduct of the 41st above all praise — I cannot get a line from Colonel S' George — Colonel Procter was provokingly delayed on his journey — I entreat Your Excellency to excuse the haste with which I presume to address you 


No comments:

Post a comment